St Mary Somerset

Top 4 St Mary Churches of London

There are countless jaw-dropping sights within the majestic capital of the United Kingdom but its churches are most indubitably parts of its “crown jewels”. Scattered throughout the city, they represent a beacon of hope and of faith to those who seek them. But it doesn’t stop here, for these churches are also architectural masterpieces that should be admired by professionals and non-professionals alike. So, without further ado, let us see the most beautiful religious structures in the city that have been dedicated to St Mary!

1. St Mary le Strand:
Known as one of the most enthralling religious beacons within the bounds of the City of Westminster (London, UK), the St Mary le Strand church is something that no tourist should miss out on. Connected to the Church of England and erected by the renowned architect James Gibbs, it was only fitting that it should be listed as a Grade I structure within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Dedicated to St Mary in 1723 and pertaining to the Diocese of London, the church presents the standards of the Baroque architectural style in astonishing detail. What’s interesting is that it has been bombarded for this architectural and artistic direction for years – no one understands artists (wink).

2. St Mary Woolnoth:
Armed with three majestic bells and, like the previous contestant, dedicated to St Mary (of the Nativity), the St Mary Woolnoth church is an excellent example of a Baroque building within the bounds of London. Designed and built by the celebrated Nicholas Hawksmoore (a contemporary of Sir Christopher Wren – the most famous of all English architects), it is one of the religious structures erected under the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches (known also as the Queen Anne Churches). Sitting upon the crossroads between the King William and Lombard streets, it has also been designated a Grade I structure within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest, exactly like the St Mary le Strand church.

3. St Mary Somerset:
Leaving the inner bounds of Queenhithe unexplored should not considered by any tourist because that is where the remains of the St Mary Somerset church (which would be towers) lie. Reconstructed by Sir Christopher Wren (the aforementioned gentleman who is responsible for a massive total of 51 churches after the Great Fire of London in 1666), it adheres to the architectural style that he preferred to use on most of his creations: the Baroque (again). Demolished in 1871 (save the towers, of course), it has been designated as a Grade I building in the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Oh, and did you know that, before World War II, it was used as a women’s restroom. Quite the transformation, eh?

4. St Mary Moorfields:
If you happen to be exploring Eldon Street near Moorgate, consider checking out the St Mary Moorfields church, one of the most extraordinary examples of a religious structure affiliated with Roman Catholicism within the bounds of the City of London. The previous incarnation of the church was demolished in 1899 and a new one was built in its stead in 1903. Hosting gatherings for the members of The Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei and designated a Grade I structure within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest (like all previous contestants), it is one of the most important centre linked with evangelism in the United Kingdom. Another fine sight to bask in within its bounds is its organ, of course, so hesitate not!

Did you enjoy our list? Which of the above-mentioned religious structures have you visited and what lasting aftertaste have they left you with? Hit the comment section below and be sure to tell us all about it in great detail. Oh, and do check back from time to time for some exciting new updates. Safe travels and see you on our next adventure!

St Mary le Strand

St Mary le Strand

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