St George's, Bloomsbury

Top 4 Churches Dedicated to St George in London

If you have already done your research on London, you probably know just how many churches there are within its bounds. The answer for those who are unaware of it: countless! So, with such an abundance of fascinating religious structures, there are bound to be multiple ones devoted to the same saint. Hence, today we are going to talk about the most important ones dedicated to Saint George for almost each and every one of them is awe-inspiring. If you like subtle architectural nuances, then you are bound to enjoy this list. So, without further ado, let’s get to the church-hunting (wink)!

1. St George in the East:
Sitting proudly deep like a pious bastion within the bounds of the London Borough of Tower Hamlets, the St George in the East church is one of the most exquisite religious structures affiliated with the Church of England and dedicated to the title saint in the capital city of the United Kingdom. Being one of the twelve churches put up under the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches, it was envisioned and designed by the world-famous student of Sir Christopher Wren (the gentleman responsible for dozens of churches after the Great Fire of London of 1666), Nicholas Hawksmoor between the years 1714 and 1729. Designated a Grade I listed building within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest, it suffered severe damage during the London Blitz of World War II but it has since been restored and reinvigorated. Quite a contestant to begin with, eh?

2. St George the Martyr, Holborn:
Moving on to the next fine centre of piety dedicated to St George, and this time, we land deep within the bounds of the London Borough of Camden, upon Queen Square (Holborn), where the St George the Martyr, Holborn church (also known as “St George’s Holborn”) lies. Also considered one of the most awe-inspiring religious structures affiliated with the Church of England in the country, it was only fitting that it should be listed as a Grade II* structure within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest. Built in 1703 by the architects Arthur Tooley and Samuel Sanders Teulon, it does St George justice with its incomparable architecture. Acquired by the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches (the aforementioned commission responsible for the twelve Queen Anne’s Churches), it was turned into a parish church in 1723.

3. St George’s, Gravesend:
You may have seen countless lavish churches in your life but we assure you that none of them are as interesting as our next contestant? Why? Well, because the St George’s, Gravesend church has found a way to make itself unique: by possessing an eye-popping Pocahontas statue right in front of it. Situated in Kent, it is the third one today to be listed in the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest (as a Grade II* structure). Pertaining to the Diocese of Rochester and serving as Gravesend’s parish church, it also received some funding from the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches in 1710 (the commission responsible for the twelve Queen Anne’s Churches), like the previous contestants. It seems that Saint George was quite trending back then (triple wink)!

4. St George’s, Bloomsbury:
It is almost unanimously agreed that St George’s, Bloomsbury is one of the most visually striking architectural marvels spawned by the Commission for Building Fifty New Churches. Becoming one of the chief attractions of the London Borough of Camden, it has lured thousands upon thousands of visitors to it during its lifetime. Affiliated with the Church of England and considered a Grade I listed building within the Statutory List of Buildings of Special Architectural or Historic Interest, its construction was initiated in 1730. Built by Nicholas Hawksmoor (like our one and only first contestant), it presents Classical architectural style standards throughout its manifestation. And, wait! Let us not forget to mention the fact that its crypt harbours the Museum of Comedy (visitable between Thursday and Sunday) – do not leave that one out!

Did you enjoy our list? Which of the aforementioned churches have you visited and what long-lasting impressions have they left you with? Hit the comment section below and tell us all about it! See you on our next adventure, brave trailblazer!

St George the Martyr, Holborn

St George the Martyr, Holborn

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